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1. How do I reattach the handle?


2. What is the best scouring pad to use?
3.
The manufacturer of my porcelain / ceramic grill voids my warranty if I use anything but a brass bristle brush. Will a steel scourer scratch the porcelain and ruin my grate?
4.
What is the Grill Wizard's recommended method for cleaning a barbecue grill grate?
5.
If left on the grill, will the handle burn?
6.
Is the brush child safe?

7. What cleaning products does Grill Wizard recommend?


8. Will the brush head rust?
9.
What care should be given to the handle?
10.
Is there an oil or preservative that can be applied to the grate to keep it from rusting if I want to clean it using detergent and hot water?
11.
Why are barbecue manufacturers producing products that are so difficult to clean with something as wimpy as a brass bristle brush?

More information can be obtained by email at the following address:
rgmfg@grillwizard.com


1. How do I reattach the handle?

A.
For right handed persons; Hold the scouring head in your left hand with the closed portion of the cylindrical grasp facing your thumb. Position / center the handle, brand facing your left thumb, vertically on the cylindrical grasp. With your left thumb, hold the handle bale wire in the crotch formed where the grasp meets the top of the scouring head. Now, rotate the handle over the cylindrical grasp until it snaps into place. The whole idea is to hold the wire so that it doesn't move over the grasp as you rotate the handle. When the wire is held in position and the handle is rotated over the grasp, the grasp circumflexes (reduces its diameter) allowing for continued rotation of the handle. The grasp is at its full flexure when the diameter of the grasp equals the distance between the bale wire and the handle groove. Thereafter, and upon continued rotation of the handle, the grasp relaxes and increases its diameter thus locking the handle in place beyond the now larger diameter of the grasp.

2. What is the best scouring pad to use?

A. A common, widely available, woven mesh steel scouring pad. If the pad is not woven, it will snag on grill contaminates and after a while it will look like "a Bad Hair Day". You can use a copper pad, but the consensus is that the steel scourers work the best.

3. The manufacturer of my porcelain / ceramic grill voids my warranty if I use anything but a brass bristle brush. Will a steel scourer scratch the porcelain and ruin my grate?

A. The reason a manufacturer says use only a brass wire brush is because besides brass, there are only steel wire brushes on the market. And burrs on the tips of a steel wire will scratch the porcelain on your grate. Field tests indicate that a steel, woven mesh scouring pad will not scratch a porcelain grate. Think about it, there is really nothing available but wire bristle brushes with scrapers at the ends of them for cleaning grates. Because barbecue manufacturers have turned to porcelain coatings to prevent grate rusting, they have no alternative but to limit what is approved for cleaning use to something that is nonabrasive in order to provide a warranty for the product. So, how is it possible to clean the contaminates (especially those which are formed from briquette or wood chip smoke) using something as fragile a brass bristle brush? Bristles which, because they are grouped in little bundles, wick up and hold contaminates and therefore quickly become more contaminated than the grill you're trying to clean.

4. What is the Grill Wizard's recommended method for cleaning a barbecue grill grate?

Step 1: If you're using conventional briquettes, remove the grate and start the grill fire, or simply start the burners on a gas grill.
Step 2: Distribute the briquettes and install the grate.
Step 3: In either case, when the grate is hot, use a scouring pad to remove contaminates. (Preferably a scouring pad attached to a Grill Wizard grill brush). Note: Allow the scouring pad to cut away contaminates. Very little pressure is required to keep the flat, thin wire of the scourer in contact with the grate. Occasionally, lightly bounce the pad on the grate to dislodge contaminates from the pad and free the loose contaminates on the grate.
Step 4: Wipe off the grate with a clean, damp towel. When the towel no longer shows signs that it is picking up contaminate residue, the grate is clean!
Step 5: After barbecuing, don't clean the grill. If your grate is prone to rusting, the fats and oils from what you just barbecued will protect the grate until the next time you want to use it.
Step 6: When the grill is cool, cover it. This doesn't mean simply close the cover. This means put a cover on the cover of your grill. Covering the grill will prevent condensation of water vapor within your grill and will additionally preclude corrosion of your investment by the weather. If you insist on cleaning the grill grate(s) after you barbecue, wait until the grate has cooled, and repeat steps 3 and 4 above. Then, in a sink, wet the grate with cold water, sprinkle it with baking soda and use a sponge pad and/or old tooth brush to mechanically abrade contaminates. Rinse the grate in cold water and towel dry. If you use hot water, the protective fats and oils will be removed from the grate and will leave the grate prone to rusting.

5. If left on the grill, will the handle burn?

A. A burn test was conducted. I built a regular charcoal fire for barbecuing a chicken, ribs and steaks, but instead of putting the meat on the grate I put the brush, replete with steel scourer, on the grate and left it there for 40 minutes. Eventually the heat of the fire diminished. The underside of the handle charred (turned black). The handle will not auto ignite (burn) when used under normal barbecuing conditions. The test brush with scourer is still useable if somebody wants to buy it.

6. Is the brush child safe?

A. No. They might pinch their finger between the stop screw and the head of the scourer. Children from ages four and up love to play with the brush. They like to work all of its features. However, do not let your child play with the Grill Wizard barbecue grill brush unless they are supervised (the brush is not as heavy as a hammer but still they could clunk themselves on the head with it).

7. What cleaning products does Grill Wizard recommend?

A. None. You see, it's a point of view. In a few short minutes, the heat of the fire kills / neutralizes any harmful microbe, or nastiness that is on the grate. Once neutralized, the grit of the nastiness, that which may possibly make the food crunchy (or if you are at the beach, sandy) is removed by the scourer installed in the head of the Grill Wizard grill brush. For more complete grate cleaning, use a clean damp towel to wipe off the last barbecue's fats, sauces, oils and the dust that may have accumulated on the grate between uses. Again, the method is,
1. Heat to neutralize.
2. Scour to remove grit.
3. Wipe to remove fluid residue.

8. Will the brush head rust?

A. Not perceptibly. All scouring head metallic components are made from stainless steel.

9. What care should be given to the handle?

A. Do not use it for any other purpose than for which it is intended, otherwise, no special care is required to preserve the handle. The handle is soaked in stain for more than five minutes during which time it absorbs the oily stain and essentially preserves it and protects it from moisture. The worst conditions that would shorten the life of the handle are frequent and prolonged exposure to moisture, or constant contact with moist earth. The handle is made from Poplar wood. It may check (slight splitting along its grain), but this event should not effect the operation of the handle.

10. Is there an oil or preservative that can be applied to the grate to keep it from rusting if I want to clean it using detergent and hot water?

A. Yes, but not recommended and remember, time is money. If you only barbecue occasionally, or seasonally, you may want to store your que away from the elements to preserve it. Since the interior of the barbecue is coated with the particulate residue from the smoke produced during cooking, and ashes if you use charcoal, this is not exactly a simple task. If you just want to clean and store the grate, when the grate is cool, scour it with the Grill Wizard grill brush to get most of the contaminates off the grate. Over the trash can, wipe the grate off with crumpled newspaper. In the kitchen sink, wet the grate with cold water, then sprinkle it with baking soda and use a common sponge to scrub it. If you use cold water to wet the grate the residues you are trying to clean will cling to the baking soda. Hot water will be less effective. When the grate is free of residue, rinse it with cold water. Now you can wash it in hot water to remove the oils and fats still clinging to the grate. Towel dry the grate and store it in a kitchen cupboard, or put it in a large plastic bag like the ones used for trash cans and tie the bag shut. Store the grate in the garage or under some cover. Bagging and covering the grate will keep moisture from rusting it. You could additionally wipe down the grate with cooking oil over some newspaper, prior to bagging it, but then its a lot ado about nothing and it seems as though the oil would end up everywhere and all of that would have to be cleaned. Try the clean and bag method first and if that is not satisfactory, consider buying a new grate every year (in the off season for the best prices) rather than oiling everything up. Unless you have a stainless steel barbecue, leaving the ashes in the bottom and the que exposed to rain will promote the rapid rusting out of the bottom of the que. The ashes will absorb moisture in the air and all in contact with steel will rust the steel. Remove the ashes. Steel scourers are really abrasive and will probably take the paint off of a painted steel que, so, use a less abrasive copper scourer, or an abrasive nylon pad, in the head of the Grill Wizard grill brush to scour residue from the inside of the barbecue. Now, bag, store or cover your barbecue to protect it from the elements and enjoy outdoor cooking next year without having to first replace the barbecue.

11. Why are barbecue manufacturers producing products that are so difficult to clean with something as wimpy as a brass bristle brush?

A. Because, somebody didn't do their homework! When the automobile first came out we had to hand crank them to get them started, people complained and starter motors were introduced. Barbecuing on a barbecue is not as old as the automobile and it seems as though it is still in development. People want to cook outdoors, because cooking indoors in the summer has too many problems associated with it. The animal in, and the nature of man is to cook food and to cook food outdoors. It used to be simple when the meat was simply skewered on a stick and positioned over a fire. What people want now and probably because manufacturers are telling them that they want it, is "searing". OK, seared meat looks great probably because we see it on TV and associate searing visually with "having been cooked", tasting great and being emotionally and physically satisfied. The best way to sear is with a heavy cast iron grate. Cast iron rusts unless you're cooking on it every day. People don't want rust on their food. Manufacturers put porcelain on the grate to prevent rust. You can't clean a porcelain grate with a steel brush because it will scratch the porcelain and rust will occur. A stainless steel grate is ten times more expensive than porcelain coated cast iron grate. Question, is it worth $260.00 for a grate that you can clean with a durable steel wire brush, for a grate that will never rust? How about a cast aluminum grate?

The bottom line.
Steel scourers are much more efficient cleaners than wire brushes because they have more surface area and because they scrape. The tip of a piece of wire doesn't scrape as well as crumpled aluminum foil. Steel scourers have ten times the effective cleaning area of a bristle brush. A dense bristle brush will quickly clog up with grease and contaminates and the wires will naturally bend and break as they are moved over a fixed surface. A widely spaced bristle brush has even less surface area with which to clean. Steel scourers are not as dense as a bristle brush and if they do clog up, it takes them a much longer time. The surface area of an abrasive nylon pad is like that of a bristle brush, or a crumpled piece of aluminum foil, minimal compared to a steel scourer. Anything made of plastic melts when used over the heat of a barbecue. Very coarse steel wool is effective and cheap but how do you manage it over a hot barbecue? Steel wool is more frail than a wire bristle, where does it end up when it breaks down? Without a doubt a steel scourer is more effective than steel wool, a brass bristle, the tiny tip of any bristle, or an abrasive nylon pad. A woven mesh steel scourer is more rugged than steel wool and won't break down to a very fine particle and stay undetected on the grate or in your food. A woven mesh steel scourer is flexible and the edges of the thin flat wire that make up a steel scourer easily snag on a rough surface. Woven mesh steel scourers outperform chemicals, steam cleaning, putty knife style scrapers and everything else except pumice in their cleaning ability. So why aren't we all using steel scourers to clean our grates with? I guess it's because it isn't an obvious problem and or solution. Or because in the past there were only plated round wire grills, which could be individually scraped with a flat piece of metal, with a half circle to fit the wire, cut out in the front edge of it (obviously the brain child of an inventor with a lot of time on his hands).

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Copyright 1999-2016 R.G. Manufacturing Cupertino, CA 95014 "Grill Wizard" is a Registered Trademark of R.G. Manufacturing, All Rights Reserved.